Michigan Cattle

at MIcattle.com

MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE�S MANDATORY CATTLE IDENTIFICATION PROGRAM

www.michigananimalid.com
The Micigan RFID Task Force is your source for complete and accurate information on mandatory electronic identification and ordering the new Michigan 840 tag.

The Michigan RFID Education Task Force was established in 2006 to develop, deliver, and assess the impact of an educational effort to enhance adoption of radio frequency identification (RFID) of cattle in Michigan.

RFID Questions and Answers
 
Still have questions?  Click on the link above for a downloadable PDF version of MDA's frequently asked questions about RFID.

The Michigan Department of Agriculture (MDA) has set the date of March 1, 2007 , by which all cattle must be identified with Radio Frequency Identification Device (RFID) electronic ear tags prior to movement from a premises.  After that date, animals will not be allowed to move with official metal ear tags or official registered breed tattoos as their identification.  This recent change is in support of Michigan �s Bovine Tuberculosis Eradication Program.  The use of RFID tags decreases the time and money required to trace animal movement within Michigan .

Michigan will be using the new Animal Identification Number (AIN) system which allows each animal to be identified with a lifetime number.  The format for the AIN is 15 numeric characters, the first three being a country code which, for the United States is 840.  EXAMPLE:  840123456789012.  As animals are bought and sold during their lifetime, the tag is never changed unless lost, and then the animal will be retagged at its current premises.

Before any tag orders can be placed, producers need a National Premises Identification Number.  The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) will assign one permanent number to each premises (location) involved in animal agriculture.  The staff in MDA�s Animal Industry Division (AID) has entered all TB tested herds into the USDA Premises Allocator.  Premises Identification Numbers contain seven alphanumeric characters.  EXAMPLE:  A123R69.  If you have a TB tested herd, you should have received a letter from the MDA with your new Premises Identification Number printed at the top.  If you need assistance in obtaining your Premises Identification Number, call the Lansing Tag Line at (866) 870-5136.

As part of its ongoing efforts to safeguard U.S. animal health, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) initiated the implementation of a National Animal Identification System (NAIS) in 2004.  The NAIS is a cooperative State-Federal-industry program administered by USDA�s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS).  A National Animal ID system will dramatically improve our ability to respond to animal disease outbreaks.  During a contagious disease outbreak, time is actually the enemy.  The more time it takes to track an animal, the more animals are exposed, the more premises become involved, and the more money it costs to contain the disease.  An animal ID system will help animal health officials identify the birthplace of a diseased animal and shorten the time required to trace the animal�s history to identify other potentially exposed animals. 

When the Michigan Department of Agriculture in November 2001 received a grant for $1.3 million for livestock identification related to bovine tuberculosis (TB), USDA officials might not have known what kind of results to expect. The program has evolved into a highly effective animal identification and tracking program. The program has demonstrated its ability to be the framework for the National Animal Identification System.

During the recent USDA station review and audit the Animal Industry Division was assigned 30 metal ear tag numbers and 30 RFID tag numbers with the intent to locate the animals in 24 hours. Staff in the division located all 60 tags along with the farm locations in 30 minutes. Excellent support by staff both in the office and field along with producer participation is the only way this type of result will occur.


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